CFC Welcomes New Policy Manager

We are very excited to have Lucy Brookham join CFC. Lucy comes to Cascade Forest Conservancy with a diverse background in environmental law and policy. Originally from Hertfordshire, England, Lucy moved to the USA in 2008 to attend college and run for the University of Utah’s track team. An avid runner with a passion for the outdoors, it was her time in Utah that sparked her interest in the protection and conservation of public lands and wild places.

LucyB_CFCLucy spent two years in Philadelphia pursuing a master’s degree before making her way back west to attend Lewis & Clark Law School, where she received her J.D. in Environmental and Natural Resources Law. Before joining Cascade Forest Conservancy, Lucy worked as a law clerk for the Northwest Environmental Defense Center, and Earthrise Law Center.

Here’s what Lucy has to say: “I am thrilled to join the CFC team as the Policy Manager and can’t wait to collaborate with our partners. In this position, I intend to work on supporting grassroots campaigns and improving legislation, policies, and forest management practices that speak directly to protecting and sustaining our iconic landscape in the heart of the Cascades.”

CFC Welcomes Molly Whitney as Executive Director

[vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=””][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”5/6″][vc_column_text]The Board of Cascade Forest Conservancy is thrilled to announce our selection of Molly Whitney to be our next Executive Director.
Molly comes to Cascade Forest Conservancy with a diverse background in conservation and extensive experience in non-profit leadership, fundraising/development, and program management. Molly’s passion comes from a deep appreciation for Pacific Northwest landscapes and a desire to protect, sustain and restore ecosystems. She holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental science, with a focus in water, from Linfield College.
Prior to joining Cascade Forest Conservancy, Molly served as Development Director at WaterWatch of Oregon, managing the organization’s events and donor relations to secure corporate, foundation and major donor gifts. Molly was previously Program Manager of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program. She is currently the Board President of Tualatin Riverkeepers.
As a native Oregonian, Molly has a lifelong relationship with the Cascade Mountains and brings a sincere enthusiasm for their protection and restoration.
About coming to CFC, Molly writes…
“I am profoundly honored and excited to be joining Cascade Forest Conservancy as Executive Director. This is an incredible opportunity to work with an amazing team of dedicated individuals who devote themselves to the advancement, protection and restoration of forests, streams, wildlife and communities at the core of the Cascades.
Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, I gained a deep appreciation for the vast and diverse ecosystems that encompass the iconic Cascades. This lifelong appreciation turned into my passion and motivated me to devote my career to the betterment of the environment, and to environmental justice. In my new role, I am proud to lead an organization that advocates for these important spaces so they may thrive for generations to come – not only for our enjoyment, but so that nature itself can prosper, in its own right. We are as much of a reflection of these spaces as they are of us.
I look forward to meeting and working with all of you – partners, supporters and advocates – to continue the impactful mission of this small but mighty organization.”
Molly will start with us on May 16th, 2019. After that date, Molly can be reached at molly@cascadeforest.org. Please join us in extending her a warm welcome![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Conservation group sues to block volcano-area mineral exploration

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Apr 9, 2019
A conservation group has sued two federal agencies in an attempt to block exploratory drilling for minerals north of Mount St. Helens, saying the activity could damage recreation in the Green River Valley, the Green River itself, wild steelhead populations and the water supply of downstream communities.
 

Monday’s action is the second time the Cascade Forest Conservancy has sued to block exploratory drilling by a Canadian Company, Ascot Resources Ltd. The suit challenges U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service decisions to permit Ascot to drill up to 63 drill holes from 23 drill sites to locate deposits of copper, gold, and molybdenum.
 
The group successfully sued to block the drilling in 2014.
 
Forest Service spokeswoman Sue Ripp said it was not their policy to comment on lawsuits. The BLM had found that the proposed exploratory drilling would present no significant environmental impact within a 900-acre area it would occur.
 
The area is popular for horseback riding, camping and hunting, and, historically, was heavily used for logging and some mining.
 
The federal prospecting permits allow for constant drilling operations, the installation of drilling-related structures and facilities, the reconstruction of 1.69 miles of decommissioned roads, and pumping up to 5,000 gallons of groundwater per day.
 
The permits are for drilling only. Establishing a full-blown mine would need to go through a separate review and permitting process, but conservationists are leery of any action that is a step toward creating a mine.
 
“Mining activities would greatly impact the fantastic backcountry recreation opportunities within the Green River valley,” Nicole Budine, Policy and Campaign Manager for Cascade Forest Conservancy, said in a prepared statement. “Recreationists come here to experience solitude, not the constant noise, dust, and lights associated with drilling. This incredible area should be protected from mining so future generations can enjoy this unique landscape.”

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Group sues to prohibit Mount St. Helens’ drilling

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Two agencies OK’d mining company permit

By Andy Matarrese, Columbian environment and transportation reporter
Published: April 9, 2019, 6:01 AM
A conservation group has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management over the agencies’ decision to allow exploratory drilling in the upper Green River Valley at Goat Mountain, near the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.
The BLM in December found mining company Ascot Resources Ltd.’s proposal to do exploratory drilling ahead of mining would present no significant environmental impact. The decision granted the Canadian mining company two hard rock prospecting permits within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.
The company’s plans call for drilling up to 63 roadside exploration holes, measuring 2 to 3 inches in diameter, to look for copper, silver, gold and molybdenum on a mining claim in the upper Green River Valley at Goat Mountain. The drilling area is about 12 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens and adjacent to, and extending northeast from, the boundary of the volcanic monument.
In February 2018, the U.S. Forest Service gave its consent to the exploratory mining.
The Cascade Forest Conservancy filed its lawsuit late last week, challenging both permitting decisions.
Read the full article here: https://www.columbian.com/news/2019/apr/09/group-sues-to-prohibit-mount-st-helens-drilling/[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

March 2019 Newsletter

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Protect Clean Water and Fish in Washington
Washington lags behind neighboring states in protecting our waters from the harmful impacts of suction dredge mining. However, the Washington State Legislature is currently considering SB 5322, which would ban suction dredge mining in critical habitat and provide Washington Department of Ecology oversight for Clean Water Act compliance for suction dredge mining.
Your help is needed, please contact your Washington State representatives and urge them to enact common sense protections for native fish populations and clean water by voting YES on SB 5322.
Suction Dredge Plume Upper AmericanThroughout the Gifford Pinchot National Forest there is a network of rivers and streams that provide clean water for communities, fish habitat, and recreation. The Wind, Cispus, Lewis, White Salmon, and the other seemingly endless rivers and tributaries inescapably intertwine clean water with the health of the forest. Clean water is also the foundation of healthy salmon populations. Each year hundreds of millions are spent in an effort to rehabilitate salmonid populations through projects that restore habitat, improve stream shading, and remove barriers to fish passage. Suction dredge mining can undo these efforts in an instant.
Read the full blog here: https://cascadeforest.org/protect-clean-water-and-fish-in-washington/

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April is Riparian Planting Month!
In partnership with the US Forest Service, CFC is continuing to embark on riparian restoration throughout the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. With the help of volunteers, we planted over 2,500 cottonwoods, willows, western redcedars, and Douglas-firs over the past two years. The trees were planted along riparian areas that were lacking trees, lacking tree diversity, and/or had unstable banks. Trees were also planted as forage in areas that could be future habitat to the beavers we release as a part of our Beaver Reineoduction Project. This year, we hope to get our the number of trees planted well in the thousands.
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For this year’s planting efforts, CFC will be leading three trips to the national forest in April. April is an ideal time to plant because the ground is saturated from melting snow and there will be many days of rain. The wet conditions will help the trees settle into the ground after they are planted.Our first trip will be an overnight trip from April 13th-14th where we will plant native trees along Trout Creek, a tributary of Wind River. Trout Creek is home to the threatened salmon species, Lower Columbia River Steelhead. Ten years ago, Hemlock Dam was removed from the creek to improve passage for the threatened steelhead and to enhance aquatic conditions. Now CFC and volunteers are going to help further restore the area by planting hundreds of seedlings. On April 20th, in honor of Earth Day, a one-day planting trip will occur in the Cipsus River Valley to continue our planting work along Yellowjacket Creek and North Fork Cispus. On April 27th, we are partnering with Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group to plant along the South Fork Toutle River to help them with their goal of extending the range of usable habitat for Chinook as well as diversify existing steelhead and coho habitat.
Please consider joining us for a planting trip in April! You can head to
https://cascadeforest.org/trip-signup/ to sign up for a trip!

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Wild & Scenic Film Festival
Join us for a night of inspiring short films about adventure, nature and conservation! On May 4 we will be screening the “Best of the Fest” – nine of the most impressive short films from the 2019 Wild & Scenic Film Festival. The event will take place at Clark College in Vancouver, WA, on May 4, 2019 from 6 pm to 9 pm. Tickets are just $15 (please purchase in advance at our website) and you can take a look at synopses of the films here: https://cascadeforest.org/get-involved/wild-scenic-film-festival/
RunWildRunFree
Before the screening there will be a short reception with food and drink, and a raffle. See you there!

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Protect Clean Water and Fish in Washington

[vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=””][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”5/6″][vc_column_text]Washington lags behind neighboring states in protecting our waters from the harmful impacts of suction dredge mining. However, the Washington State Legislature is currently considering SB 5322, which would ban suction dredge mining in critical habitat and provide Washington Department of Ecology oversight for Clean Water Act compliance for suction dredge mining.
Your help is needed. Please contact your Washington State representatives and urge them to enact common sense protections for native fish populations and clean water by voting YES on SB 5322.

Steelhead Critical Habitat in Southwest Washington

Throughout the Gifford Pinchot National Forest there is a network of rivers and streams that provide clean water for communities, fish habitat, and recreation. The Wind, Cispus, Lewis, White Salmon, and the other seemingly endless rivers and tributaries inescapably intertwine clean water with the health of the forest. Clean water is also the foundation of healthy salmon populations. Each year hundreds of millions are spent in an effort to rehabilitate salmonid populations through projects that restore habitat, improve stream shading, and remove barriers to fish passage. Suction dredge mining can undo these efforts in an instant.
Suction dredge mining impacts rivers and threatened fish populations. The process uses a motorized hose system to vacuum up the stream bottom in search of gold. In doing this, suction dredge mining can cause erosion and sedimentation, and mobilize heavy metals that were settled in the sediment. Salmonids are very sensitive to heavy metals due to the impact it has on their sense of smell. Using these machines in riparian areas can also result in localized water contamination and increased stream temperatures due to loss of riparian vegetation. The disruption to the streambed during suction dredge mining also impacts the life cycles of fish by harming eggs and juveniles, destruction of habitat features such as large woody debris, and changing the physical nature of the stream.
 
Recognizing the impact of suction dredge mining on clean water and threatened fish populations, neighboring states have taken action to regulate or ban this activity. Washington has continued to allow suction dredge mining with little regulation, putting our state’s precious waters at risk. Now is the time for Washington to act to regulate suction dredge mining, so we can leave a legacy of healthy watersheds and abundant native fish populations for future generations to enjoy.
Please contact your Washington State representative and urge them to support SB 5322 for our native fish and waters. Find your representative here: https://app.leg.wa.gov/districtfinder/
 
Large suction dredge machinery can harm riparian vegetation

Suction dredge mining results in reduced water quality by sending a plume of sediment downstream.

 
Map via https://www.westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/publications/gis_maps/maps/salmon_steelhead/critical_habitat/steelhead/steelhead_lcr_ch.pdf[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

CFC hiring a new Executive Director

[vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css_animation=””][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”5/6″][vc_column_text]The Cascade Forest Conservancy seeks a full-time, passionate Executive Director to lead forest protection, conservation, education, and advocacy in the lush heart of the Cascade Mountain Ecoregion. The Director is responsible for running and growing the nonprofit organization, telling our compelling story, and expanding our network of strategic partnerships. This hands-on position works closely with CFC staff and Board of Directors, as well as with community leaders in the region. Located in desirable Portland, Oregon metro region. Please see  www.cascadeforest.org/get-involved/employment/ for additional information.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Daily Chronicle: Researchers, Conservationists Raise Alarm About Proposed Road Through Mount St. Helens Pumice Plain

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RECOVERY: Thirty-Three Active Research Studies Are Taking Place on Land Buried in Ash, Scientists Worry About Effect of Proposed Road

By Alex Brown / The Daily Chronicle / abrown@chronline.com

The Pumice Plain on Mount St. Helens is one of the most unique places on Earth, a 6 square mile landscape that was buried in ash during the mountain’s 1980 eruption, where almost no trace of human influence remains.
For that reason, it’s proved fertile ground for scientists, where researchers of many disciplines have spent the nearly four decades since the eruption literally watching nature run its course. The formation of streams, the return of plants and animals all are the subject of ongoing studies in this singular environment. Currently, 33 active research studies are taking place on the Pumice Plain. 
“It can’t be overstated just how useful having something like this is,” said Dr. Jim Gawel, associate professor at the University of Washington, Tacoma. 
Gawel has been conducting research at the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument since 2008, studying how changes in the surrounding landscape affect productivity at Spirit Lake, looking at things like nitrogen and phosphorus cycles. Those changes and their subsequent effects have all been wholly natural — but maybe not for long.
The U.S. Forest Service has proposed building a road through the Pumice Plain, an area where even hikers are directed not to step off the trail. Late last year, the agency released a Finding of No Significant Impact, clearing the project for the next phase of the environmental review process.
The road — which is slated to run just less than three miles — would serve a serious purpose. It’s designed to allow access to the Spirit Lake Tunnel, which was built to help drain the lake after its natural outflow was blocked by debris from the eruption. If the tunnel were to fail, lake levels could rise and breach the debris barrier, causing catastrophic flooding all the way to Interstate 5. 
For decades, transportation to the tunnel has generally been conducted with helicopters, flying in workers to do inspection and maintenance. The proposed road would allow off-road utility vehicles to get to the lake, making access much easier. The project also includes the drilling of core samples to study the composition and stability of the debris blockage.
The decision notice issued by Monument Ranger Rebecca Hoffman noted that 50,000 people live in the projected inundation area of a Spirit Lake flood, and overdue maintenance on the tunnel is already on the order of tens of millions of dollars. Though the document acknowledges the road could affect some of the science taking place on the Pumice Plain, it says that public safety takes precedent.
Though scientists and conservationists acknowledge public safety is important, they’re skeptical that building a road is the urgent matter the Forest Service is making it out to be.“They’re triggering this emergency clause that allows them to fast-track things,” said Matt Little, executive director of the Cascade Forest Conservancy. “We also want to address the safety concerns, but we also don’t think the solution should be literally bulldozed through the Pumice Plain in the most sensitive research area of Mount St. Helens with incomplete review. They haven’t shown us that there’s any emergency at this point.”
Read the full article here: http://www.chronline.com/news/researchers-conservationists-raise-alarm-about-proposed-road-through-mount-st/article_18e147d8-2003-11e9-b5e2-3f911019abc1.html
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January 2019 Newsletter

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CFC Leadership Transition Announcement

Dear Friends,
MATT_NOHOV 2
After leading more than four years of growth at the Cascade Forest Conservancy (CFC), I will soon take on a new role at Social Venture Partners Portland, a local nonprofit that builds the capacity of other nonprofits by investing human, social, and financial capital. In February, CFC will begin a hiring process to find a new executive director, and I will remain highly involved throughout the transition.
When I joined the Gifford Pinchot Task Force in 2014, I became part of a growing movement to conserve the beautiful and unique resources of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. We set off to create a new strategic plan based on science and focused on addressing climate change, watershed health, and connecting people to nature. We developed a new name and brand for our group, and people responded. Today we are the Cascade Forest Conservancy, with more than 12,000 members and volunteers. Since 2014, our organization has doubled in size, and we have a solid team of professionals on our staff and board. We have launched bold new conservation programs and established new standards for sustainable timber management, water quality, and wildlife health.
Thank you for your help in making all this possible. It has been an honor to work with you and the CFC team. Please continue to support us as we approach this next stage of growth for Cascade Forest Conservancy!
Matt Little
____________________________________________________________________
A note from CFC’s Board of Directors:
On behalf of the board of the Cascade Forest Conservancy, we want to thank Matt for his great success in taking our organization to new heights and helping us to bring in so many new members, donors, and volunteers like you. We are sad to see Matt go, but know that his talents and heart for service will be used for the greater good in the region. We wish him all the best.
Matt will continue to stay involved with day-to-day operations at CFC as Executive Director while the Board of Directors initiates a nationwide search for his replacement. Matt has graciously agreed to play a dual role for SVP and CFC during this transition period, and will work closely with the new hire to provide training and a smooth handoff of responsibilities.
Be assured that all CFC programs will continue to operate and grow as planned in our strategic plan (available online at https://cascadeforest.org/about-us/strategy/). CFC will continue offering amazing events and opportunities for you to engage with us during this upcoming field season.
We appreciate your continued support of CFC as we implement our mission to “protect and sustain forests, streams, wildlife, and communities in the heart of the Cascades through conservation, education, and advocacy.”
Thank you!
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Protecting Mount St Helens

Mount St. Helens and the surrounding areas impacted by the 1980 eruption are a Pacific Northwest icon. The impact of the eruption, and the recolonization of plants and animals in the decades since, has created a unique environment that is treasured throughout the world. Since our founding in 1985, Cascade Forest Conservancy has worked to protect the Mount St. Helens region from activities that would harm this irreplaceable landscape. Currently, our work near Mount St. Helens involves continuing to fight a hardrock mining proposal on the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Border, and opposing an administrative road across the heart of the Pumice Plain.
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2018 ended with some disappointing decisions from the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management on these projects. In November the Forest Service released a draft decision notice authorizing an administrative access route across the Pumice Plain. This route would drastically impact the ecology and scientific research on the Pumice Plain. Cascade Forest Conservancy, researchers, and concerned citizens submitted objection letters to the Forest Service during the objection period, which ended on December 21. We are now waiting for the Forest Service to respond to our objections, which may be delayed due to the federal government shutdown.
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In December the Bureau of Land Management granted Ascot Resources permits to conduct exploratory drilling in the Green River valley, at the edge of the Mount St. Helens blast zone. These permits are the final action by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management to allow exploratory drilling by Ascot to search for copper, gold, and molybdenum. CFC is concerned with exploratory drilling in the Green River valley because the 24/7 drilling and associated road closures would negatively impact recreation in this backcountry area. Exploratory drilling is also the first step toward developing a hard rock mine, which would be catastrophic for the water quality of the Green River and surrounding valley. We will continue to oppose the exploratory drilling permits and urge our representatives in Congress to take action to protect the Green River valley from mining.Mount St. Helens: No Place for a Mine: https://cascadeforest.org/stop-the-mine/
To learn more about our work to protect the Pumice Plain, read this blog: https://cascadeforest.org/protecting-the-unique-environment-of-mount-st-helens/

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2019 Trip Update!

Stay tuned for our 2019 volunteer trip list, coming out in February!
Learn more about our citizen science program here: https://cascadeforest.org/our-work/citizen-science/
 
trips

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Join the CFC Canvass!

CFC is still looking for dedicated, outgoing canvassers to join their Portland-based team!  If you love CFC, and making a difference, why not join us?  Evening shifts available.  To learn more, read the full job description here: https://cascadeforest.org/get-involved/employment/[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Press Release

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Drilling Approved Near Mount St. Helens

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 3, 2018
CONTACTS:
Nicole Budine, Policy and Campaign Manager, Cascade Forest Conservancy, 607-735-3753
Matt Little, Executive Director, Cascade Forest Conservancy, 541-678-2322
Tom Buchele, Managing Attorney, Earthrise Law Center, 503-768-6736

Drilling Approved Near Mount St. Helens
Conservation and Recreation Groups Oppose Due to Impacts on Fish, Water Quality and Recreation.

Portland, OR – On December 3, 2018, the Bureau of Land Management granted permits to conduct exploratory drilling in the Green River valley, just outside the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. The Forest Service issued a similar decision consenting to drilling on these lands in February 2018. A coalition of over 20 conservation and recreation groups opposes the project, claiming mining exploration and development will destroy recreational opportunities in the area, significantly harm wild steelhead populations in the Green River, and pollute the water supply of downstream communities.
“Tens of thousands of people have expressed opposition to this dangerous mining proposal that would impact one of our most treasured National Monuments,” said Matt Little, Executive Director of the Cascade Forest Conservancy. “Approving mining activities along a pristine river that is in the shadow of an active volcano is absurd. We will work with downstream communities, backcountry recreationists, and local concerned citizens to protect this treasured river valley for future generations.”
The drilling permits allow Ascot Resources Ltd., a Canadian mining company, to drill up to 63 drill holes from 23 drill sites to locate deposits of copper, gold, and molybdenum. The project would include extensive industrial mining operations 24/7 throughout the summer months on roughly 900 acres of public lands in the Green River valley, just outside the northeast border of the Monument. The prospecting permits allow for constant drilling operations, the installation of drilling-related structures and facilities, the reconstruction of 1.69 miles of decommissioned roads, and pumping up to 5,000 gallons of groundwater per day.
Some parcels of land in question were acquired to promote recreation and conservation under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act (LWCFA). In a previous lawsuit filed by the Cascade Forest Conservancy (then the Gifford Pinchot Task Force), a federal judge invalidated Ascot’s drilling permits and held that the agencies violated the LWCFA by failing to recognize that mining development cannot interfere with the outdoor recreational purposes for which the land was acquired. This decision by the BLM and Forest Service to once again issue Ascot drilling permits follows the release of a modified EA in 2017, prepared in response to this prior court decision.
“This project would severely impact recreation opportunities due to noise, dust, exhaust fumes, lights, vehicle traffic, the presence of drill equipment, and project area closures,” said Tom Buchele, Managing Attorney of the Earthrise Law Center. “I cannot fathom how the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management could legally conclude that drilling would not interfere with recreation without violating the LWCFA.”
The pristine Green River flows through the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, passing through old growth as well as a unique post-eruption environment that provides habitat for a variety of native fish and wildlife. The Green River flows into the North Fork Toutle River and Cowlitz River, which provides drinking water to thousands of people in downstream communities.
The following coalition voices have expressed their consistent opposition to efforts to develop a mine near Mount St. Helens.
“This prospecting is a threat to wild steelhead in the Green River and the rest of the Toutle and Cowlitz River system,” said Steve Jones, Clark-Skamania Flyfishers. “Washington fisheries managers made the upper Green River a Wild Steelhead Gene Bank in 2014 because this habitat offered the best hope for sustaining wild fish in that system. This river drainage needs to be conserved, not exploited.”
“This is a short-sighted decision that taxpayers will ultimately be forced to fix,” said Kitty Craig, Acting Washington State Director for the Wilderness Society. “Paving the way for industrial mining operations in the blast zone of an active volcano is a recipe for disaster.”
“Mount St. Helens is no place for a mine,” said Tom Uniack, Executive Director for Washington Wild. “The greater economic and social value of this incredible area lies with the equestrian, mountain biking, and other world-class recreational opportunities accessible to local residents and visitors alike.”
“With outstanding recreation, as a wild steelhead sanctuary, and as a source of clean drinking water for downstream communities, the Green River – a candidate Wild and Scenic River – is the last place for a mine,” said David Moryc, Director for Wild and Scenic Rivers for American Rivers. “The Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management should not be green-lighting mining on our public lands that were purchased explicitly for conservation and recreation purposes,”
“The Green River and its downstream rivers the North Fork Toutle River and Cowlitz are home to three species of wild steelhead and salmon listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA),” said Rich Simms, founder of the Wild Steelhead Coalition. “This mining project will undermine the immense work being done to protect these imperiled fish. It is absurd this ludicrous project is even being considered, yet alone moving forward for approval.”
 

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DOCUMENTS:
Bureau of Land Management FONSI: https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/nepa/52147/163268/199263/BLM_FONSI_20181002.pdf
Bureau of Land Management Decision Record: https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/nepa/52147/163270/199265/BLMDecisionRecord20181002.pdf
Cascade Forest Conservancy Objection Letter: https://www.cascadeforest.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/final-objection-on-letterhead-1.pdf
Judge Hernandez’s Opinion: https://law.lclark.edu/live/files/17566-gifford-pinchot-mining-decisionpdf.
 
MAPS/PHOTOS:
Map of the Project Area: https://cascadeforest.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Map-of-Mt-St-Helens-mine-area-zoomed-in.jpg
Green River Valley photo: https://www.cascadeforest.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/IMG_5183.jpg
Green River: https://www.cascadeforest.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Green-River-July-2018-015-1.jpg
Green River valley aerial: https://www.cascadeforest.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/IMG_6177.jpg
Green River valley aerial labelled: https://www.cascadeforest.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/GRV-labelled-aerial.jpg
 
VIDEO:
Cascade Forest Conservancy “Mount St. Helens: No Place for a Mine” : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjVk78cVNCk[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/12″][/vc_column][/vc_row]